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  • Dave Harmon, PW editor

Researchers surprised to find wreckage of last US slave ship, scuttled in 1860, still mostly intact

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Researchers studying the wreckage of the last U.S. slave ship, buried in mud on the Alabama coast since it was scuttled in 1860, have made the surprising discovery that most of the wooden schooner remains intact, including the pen that was used to imprison African captives during the brutal journey across the Atlantic Ocean.


While the upper portion of the two-masted Clotilda is gone, the section below deck where the captured Africans and stockpiles were held is still largely in one piece after being buried for decades in a section of river that hasn't been dredged, said maritime archaeologist James Delgado of the Florida-based SEARCH Inc.


https://www.npr.org/2021/12/22/1067078342/wreckage-of-last-slave-ship-clotilda-alabama

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